Agenda

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Pre-Conference Workshops
Keynotes
Performance Improvement/Quality
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Leadership
Supply Management
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Sunday | January 27

  1. 2:00 PM – 5:00 PM
    Pre-Conference Workshops

    Pre-conference Workshop: CSSM® Exam Prep

    Earning the CSSM credential is a pathway for today’s perioperative nurse leaders to advance their careers and improve operational performance. In this workshop, attendees will learn about the exam and how to prepare for it. In-depth review will be given to two challenging exam subject areas—financial and operational management. Attendees will receive expert guidance on test question format and benefit from reviewing exam-formatted practice questions. Confidence and preparation are essential elements of exam prep, and this session provides both.

    Attendees will be eligible for 6 contact hours of continuing nursing education upon successful completion of the workshop, including completion of a pre-reading assignment and a post-course evaluation.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Identify the elements of a multiple-choice, one-correct-answer exam question.
    • Identify the basic steps involved with developing various perioperative budgets (eg, capital, operating).
    • Discuss methods of monitoring operational and financial performance in the perioperative setting. Identify guiding principles in effective inventory management. Describe the differences between regulatory and accrediting agencies. Discuss coordination of standards and recommendations for implementation.
    • Brandon Bennett, DNP, RN, CNS, CNOR, CNS-CP, CSSM, CEN, NE-BC, Principal instructor, CSSM Exam Prep Course, Competency and Credentialing Institute
  2. 2:00 PM – 5:00 PM
    Pre-Conference Workshops

    Pre-conference Workshop: Slice and Dice Data to Improve Performance and Patient Outcomes

    The business of perioperative care delivery is changing. The need to combine clinical, financial, and operational acumen has never been greater. Along with that comes the need to analyze data to assess performance and identify areas for improvement. It can be a daunting task, but OR business managers can take on a leadership role by leveraging data to support the care delivery mission. Join the perioperative leadership team from Mercy as they explore how to define OR profitability, the financial impact of service lines, what to consider when crafting contracts, and how supply chain supports all of these goals. This will be an interactive workshop, so come prepared to engage!

    Learning Objectives:

    • Discuss the Mercy team’s process for assessing their financial performance and how they applied their findings to bundled payment models.
    • Describe the critical cross-functional tasks needed to engage clinicians in specific service lines and the data that helped surgeons understand their role in managing costs.
    • Define the data elements needed to support an understanding of device use and how to use this information to negotiate solid contracts.
    • Moderator - Ms. Nancy Pakieser, Sr. Dir, Ind Dev, TECSYS Inc.
    • Jessica Bader, BSN, RN, OR Manager, Mercy Hospital
    • Matthew Mentel, CMRP, Executive Director, Integrated Performance Solutions, Mercy Hospital
    • Betty Jo Rocchio, MS, CRNA, Chief Nursing Officer, Mercy Hospital
    • Emily Tchiblakian, MHA, BSN, RN, Perioperative Services Resource Optimization, Mercy Hospital

Monday | January 28

  1. 8:30 AM – 9:00 AM

    Networking Breakfast

    Sponsored by: Cardinal Health new.jpg
  2. 9:00 AM – 9:45 AM
    Keynotes

    Opening Keynote: Business Intelligence—The Intersection of Analytics and Operations

    Perioperative leaders can access immense amounts of information, but rarely do they understand how best to use it. Becoming intelligent requires accessing the right information and applying it effectively. By learning to ask different questions about our business at Vanderbilt, we got better information that opened an avenue for business development that was rarely interconnected with operations. David Wyatt, MPH, RN, CNOR, NEA-BC, associate operating officer/associate nursing officer at Vanderbilt University Hospital and Clinics, will discuss how synergizing discussions with analytics and operations leaders changes how leaders think and drives more effective business decision making and strategy.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Describe three ways in which integration of analytics and operations improves business intelligence.
    • Identify three new perspectives on the business of perioperative services.
    • Describe two strategies for improving business intelligence in perioperative services.
    • David Wyatt, MPH, BSN, RN, NEA-BC, CNOR, Associate Operating Officer, Perioperative Enterprise and Associate Nursing Officer, Surgery Patient Care Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center
  3. 10:00 AM – 11:00 AM
    Performance Improvement/Quality

    Implementing Enhanced Surgical Recovery: The Future Is Yesterday

    Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) has been linked with better outcomes and reduced costs, but not everyone knows how to implement and sustain such a program. We implemented ERAS at Presbyterian Novant Medical Center in May 2016 in colorectal surgery and rapidly expanded it to bariatric, urologic, gynecologic/oncologic, gynecologic, and hepatobiliary patients. Our projected patient participation grew from 159 patients in 2016 to more than 2,000 in 2018, and we reduced cost per case and length of stay in colorectal and bariatric surgery patients. We will discuss how to achieve collaboration among all the stakeholders and develop a successful, sustainable ERAS protocol.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Describe the elements of ERAS and how they improve patient outcomes.
    • Identify the stakeholders and ways they can collaborate in implementing ERAS.
    • Describe essential steps to program implementation and change management. Identify the resources needed to create an ERAS protocol.

    Take-home tool:
    A diagram mapping out the steps of the implementation of enhanced recovery and the elements needed in each step.

    • Karen Jenkins, BSN, RN, CNOR, Director of Surgical Services, Novant Health Presbyterian Medical Center
    • Vicki Morton, DNP, MSN, AGNP-BC, Director of Clinical and Quality Outcomes, Providence Anesthesiology Associates
  4. 10:00 AM – 11:00 AM
    Finance/Analytics

    Successful Guide to Requesting OR Capital

    When requesting a capital equipment purchase, regardless of whether it’s for the newest, greatest technology available or simply a replacement of outmoded equipment, it can be daunting to compile all the supporting documentation. We will share strategies and tips to help you succeed in getting all of your capital requests approved by your CEO. We will also discuss the importance of creating a 5-year capital plan and maintaining an updated inventory of your OR equipment.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Describe how to compile and analyze supporting data to help justify your request.
    • Identify benchmarking services to save on costs.
    • Discuss tips for negotiating with vendors.

    Take-home tool:
    Capital Request Checklist—the UFHealth Shands checklist can be customized to fit the needs of each individual organization.

    • Robin Main, MHA, Perioperative Business Services Manager, UF Health Shands
    • Tatiana Rodrigues Da Costa, BSA, Perioperative Business Services Manager, UF Health Shands
  5. 10:00 AM – 11:00 AM
    Leadership

    Surgeon Paradox: Employed with Private Practice Behaviors

    Surgeons increasingly are becoming employees of healthcare facilities, but some of them behave like private practice physicians rather than employees. Essential components of matching staffing to demand—such as accurate case scheduling, full block utilization, and on-time starts—are challenging for employed and private surgeons alike. Why? Is it unreasonable to expect better compliance from surgeons who are employed? What performance expectations should be included in surgeon employment contracts to ensure fiscally responsible staffing and safe patient care? Hospital executives and perioperative leaders share responsibility to facilitate a successful surgeon transition from independent to employed, on paper and in action.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Identify three essential elements of an employed surgeon contract.
    • Discuss how hospital executives and perioperative leaders can facilitate a successful transition from private to employed.
    • Describe the critical points of matching staffing to demand, coupled with performance expectations, for all surgeons.

    Take-home tool:
    Checklists, employed surgeon contract elements, key performance expectations, and steps for successful facilitation from private to employed status.

    • Mary Jane Edwards, RN, CNOR, FACHE, Managing Director, Deloitte Consulting
  6. 11:00 AM – 11:30 AM

    Morning Networking Break

    Sponsored by: HCA.JPG
  7. 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM
    Performance Improvement/Quality

    Teamwork Makes the Dream Work

    A culture of collaboration, engagement, and trust is what surgical teams need to start and finish strong. At the Cleveland Clinic, we have expanded our core team of nursing, surgeons, and anesthesia providers to include administrators, finance, and analyst professionals. This has helped break down silos and enhance relationships with clinicians. Having leadership roles of surgical chairman and vice chairmen at the core of the team has helped us maintain a holistic approach. We will discuss the importance of making the team accessible and accountable to one another, and how doing so has improved our communication and workflow.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Describe the structure of an enhanced leadership model for surgical operations.
    • Discuss the ways in which partnership throughout the department fosters trust, communication, efficiency, and effectiveness.
    • Discuss the impact of cultural changes on overlapping surgery, service line movements, and block optimization.

    Take-home Tool:
    Tip sheet to develop a multidisciplinary structure for governance for facilities of any size.

    • Natalie Bright, MBA, MSM, RN, CNOR, Department Administrator, Surgical Operations, Cleveland Clinic
    • Carol Pehotsky, DNP, RN, CPAN, ACNS-BC, NEA-BC, Associate Chief Nursing Officer, Surgical Services and Senior Director, Surgical Nursing, Main Campus, Cleveland Clinic
  8. 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM
    Finance/Analytics

    The Mayo Clinic Approach to OR Growth and Modernization

    In 2015, the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, was faced with the need to expand surgical capacity and modernize existing ORs. A surgical facilities master plan was created that enabled facility leaders to add approximately 8,000 surgical cases to their annual 57,000 cases and to modernize ORs without any extended decreases in capacity due to downtime. We will outline best practices for master planning, budgeting, and design process to interrelate maintenance and growth while modernizing an existing OR facility.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Discuss the importance of a facilities master plan.
    • Describe how to interrelate maintenance and growth.
    • Identify steps needed to move from budget call to occupancy.

    Take-home tool:
    Tool to calculate OR capacity required to accommodate growth.

    • Chris Nelson, PE, LEED, AP BD+C, Project Manager, Mayo Clinic
    • Beau Tordsen, MS, BBA, Asset Administrator, Mayo Clinic
  9. 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM
    Leadership

    Developing a Robust Staffing Model for Postanesthesia Care Units

    When Cleveland Clinic leaders challenged managers across all units to work at the 35th percentile, we found that productivity in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) fell short of this goal. By analyzing census data across all PACUs down to the half hour and for each day of the week, as well as other aspects of our workflow, we identified staffing changes that were needed. Since revamping both staffing needs and shifts, we have maintained our 35th percentile productivity goal, cut nursing costs, and increased efficiency by 10%.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Discuss the concept of our 35th percentile productivity goal.
    • Describe how our model was created.
    • Identify at least one measure of success stemming from implementation of the Cleveland Clinic model.

    Take-home tool:
    A tool to help calculate historical turnover to determine proactive hiring needs.

    • Jackie Bates, MSN, CMSRN, NE-BC, Director of Nursing, Cleveland Clinic
    • Cory Guy, CPA, MBA, Finance Manager, Cleveland Clinic
  10. 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
    Keynotes

    Keynote Luncheon: How Does the Business Management of the OR Need to Change?

    Perioperative services are still the driver of profitability for better-performing hospitals and health systems, but 80% of all surgical procedures are performed on an outpatient basis, and perioperative services are managed differently in hospitals vs outpatient centers. As advances in technology and pain management increase the number of surgeries done in ambulatory settings, hospitals will be caring for primarily high-acuity patients.

    To meet the needs of these rapidly evolving care models, OR business professionals need to:
    o understand emerging trends
    o identify and focus on core specialties
    o establish a competitive advantage
    o obtain necessary capital for technology investments
    o manage profitability as costs shift between surgical platforms
    o leverage predictive analytics to help manage resources
    o adopt new strategies to identify emerging technologies and surgical approaches

    • Jeffry Peters, MBA, CEO, Surgical Directions
    Sponsored by: Surgical-Directions.jpg
  11. 1:45 PM – 2:45 PM
    Performance Improvement/Quality

    Riding Out the Storm: Managing Operations in the Wake of Disaster

    During a 6-month period, our institution was hit with Hurricane Harvey, a winter storm, and an unexpected computer crash during business hours. We coped with flooding of our sterile processing and materials management units, storms impacting staff availability, and losing accessibility to electronic medical records while image-guided surgery was in progress. We will share our hard-earned lessons on disaster management for the perioperative environment, including tips for damage control, recovery, prioritization, and communication.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Discuss how to assess damage and find alternatives that allow operations to proceed.
    • Describe how to prioritize recovery efforts based on patient urgency and resource availability.
    • Develop communication frameworks that allow for quick exchange of critical information.

    Take-home tool:
    Guidelines for creating crisis management protocols within perioperative services.

    • Abigail Caudle, MD, MS, Executive Medical Director, Perioperative Services, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
    • Lisa McMillian, Associate Director, Perioperative Materials Utilization & Sterile Processing, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
  12. 1:45 PM – 2:45 PM
    Finance/Analytics

    Procedure-Based Budgeting

    Budgeting in times of reduced reimbursement, increasing costs, and vendor consolidation can be difficult and stressful. We will demonstrate a method of budget development that accounts for not only OR costs, but also institutional margin by procedure. Using this method allows OR managers to defend expense budget increases by demonstrating an improved margin for the institution, inclusive of the additional expenses. Using historical procedure mix and projected volume, participants will learn how procedure-based budgeting can improve the budget process.

    Take-home tool:
    Information on how to acquire historical procedure volume and convert institutional margin analyses into budget justifications.

    • Stephanie Casanova, MBA, Senior Manager of Perioperative Business Services, Massachusetts General Hospital
    • Stephen Spring, BA, Senior Administrative Director , Finance, Massachusetts General Hospital
  13. 1:45 PM – 2:45 PM
    Leadership

    The New Grad RN Millennial—Staffing the OR for the Future!

    One way to compensate for the nursing shortage is to “grow your own” by fostering an environment for new graduates to learn the ropes. We will show you how to adopt a training and onboarding model that will interest the new RN graduate and integrate the needs of a Millennial learner into a multigenerational OR team. Building a workforce with these future leaders will help you reduce reliance on agency nurses and save on costs, and using Periop 101 to structure their education will empower them with the skills they need to succeed.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Discuss the cost benefit of the grow-your-own process.
    • Describe how to recruit the right candidates, conduct interviews, and facilitate onboarding.
    • Describe how to get buy-in from tenured OR staff who will need to work with the younger generation.

    Take-home tool:
    Peer-based interview questions and scenarios to identify the right candidates for hire.
    MOU and you!—the commitment plan for the new RN graduate.

    • Jerry Criswell, MSN, BSN, RN, CNOR, Associate Chief Nursing Officer, USPI-Tenet HealthCare
    • Laura F. Sittler, MBA, BSN, RN, CNOR, NEA-BC, Chief Nursing Officer, USPI-Tenet HealthCare
  14. 2:45 PM – 3:15 PM

    Afternoon Networking Break

    Sponsored by: WestCMR-High-Res-Logo.jpg
  15. 3:15 PM – 4:15 PM
    Performance Improvement/Quality

    How to Manage and Sustain a Multidepartmental Robotic Program

    How do you build and maintain a growing robotics program within a defined block-allocated space? A creative algorithm for case placement allowed our multidepartmental services to use four robotic rooms. We will explore methodology used and the collaboration needed to bring about this dynamic scheduling of robotic cases within a non-flexible space. We will also discuss the business case for creating a specialized robotics team and the ability to incentivize this work.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Describe the current state of a robotics program.
    • Identify the changes needed within your program.
    • Discuss how to track progress to ensure a progressive future state.
    • Sonja Walsh, RNFA, BSN, CNOR, CSSM, Perioperative Services Manager, Gen, GenONC, Urology, Robotics and Orthopedics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center
  16. 3:15 PM – 4:15 PM
    Performance Improvement/Quality

    Six Sigma Approach to Turnover

    The five phases of Six Sigma (define, measure, analyze, improve, and control) can be applied to improve turnover time. Staff from environmental services, transportation, preoperative evaluation, and the postanesthesia care unit all need to be involved. We will review how UPMC used data to examine and control the throughput process for more consistency.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Identify the components involved in turnover time and the associated data points.
    • Discuss how to analyze the data to find bottlenecks and opportunities.
    • Describe how to develop a plan based on that data.

    Take-home tool:
    An Excel spreadsheet showing the associated data points and different calculations needed to develop a plan.

    • Benjamin Ellis, MBA, LSSBB, Business Manager, Surgical & Anesthesia Services, UPMC Presbyterian Hospital
  17. 3:15 PM – 4:15 PM
    Supply Management

    Super-Sized Inventory? Take Control of Your Instruments

    Matching reusable instrument supply with increasing OR demands is a common problem. To streamline our inventory and reduce costs, we launched a comprehensive, multidisciplinary project involving surgeons and OR nursing. We evaluated instrument set inventory, contents, and other information to reduce same-day turnover and improve accountability as well as our tracking system accuracy. We’ve achieved significant cost savings, even in the early phases. For example, a sub-service with 17 instrument sets was reduced to 10; 3 existing instrument sets were combined into just 1; and the contents of the largest, most used instrument set were reduced by 40%.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Identify inventory categories and determine maximum instrument set usage vs booked procedure usage.
    • Describe how to involve clinical users in modifying inventory.
    • Discuss how to plan and meet the demands of ongoing changes to volume, growth, and procedure change.

    Take-home tool:
    A template of how we tracked changes and progress for each service.

    • Jacob Flaherty, CRCST, Customer Service Manager, CSPS, Massachusetts General Hospital
    • Mark Rosa, BS, CRCST, CHL, Director of Operations, CSPS, Massachusetts General Hospital
  18. 4:15 PM – 4:45 PM

    Speed Networking

    Networking…with a twist! Join us before the welcome reception to accelerate your contacts. Through this structured and fast-paced event, you’ll meet many new peers, colleagues, and friends. Don’t forget your business cards!

  19. 4:45 PM – 6:15 PM

    Welcome Reception

    Sponsored by: CCI Logo Without Tagline.jpg

Tuesday | January 29

  1. 8:30 AM – 9:00 AM

    Networking Breakfast

    Sponsored by: Healthcare_IQ_Logo.png
  2. 9:00 AM – 9:45 AM
    Keynotes

    Opening Keynote: Thinking Outside the Box: Seeing What’s Possible

    Everyone wants us to think outside the box, but very few people show us how. As a magician and mentalist, Michael Karl makes his living by thinking differently and making the impossible possible. His interest in human behavior and how people can influence others led him to develop his skills as a psychological illusionist, or mentalist. He has shared insights with Fortune 500 companies including MARS, Indeed, AT&T, Hilton, and Priceline. In this presentation, he will demonstrate magic and reverse engineer his illusions to help you rethink your everyday problem solving. Attendees will gain a different perspective that will enable them to actually think outside the box.

    • Michael Karl, Keynote Speaker and Mentalist, Influence Your Audience
  3. 10:00 AM – 11:00 AM
    Performance Improvement/Quality

    What Sets Successful Partnerships Apart?

    There is a fundamental disconnect between what most people believe is the path to successful partnerships with clinicians and what actually leads to a healthy, supportive, and effective partnership. While there is certainly no "one size fits all" approach, focusing on certain behaviors will improve an individual leader's chance of success.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Demonstrate responsible decision making and personal accountability.
    • Discuss critical and reflective thinking abilities.
    • Describe a range of skills and abilities to help leaders develop partnerships with clinicians.
    • John Polikandriotis, PhD, MBA, MPH, FACHE, CMPE, CEO, Vail Summit Orthopaedics
  4. 10:00 AM – 11:00 AM
    Finance/Analytics

    Weight Matters in OR Reimbursement

    Designing an optimized surgery charging structure can be challenging, but doing so is essential to an organization’s surgery revenue capture and bottom line. This presentation will detail how we used unique data analytics and creative innovation to revamp the surgery charge structure in a rural community hospital. We maximized reimbursement by basing charge on CPT code weights instead of procedure levels.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Discuss the current landscape of healthcare reimbursement and the need to change how surgery charges are captured.
    • Describe a method for improving the capture of surgical revenue based on weighted CPT codes.
    • Discuss the pros and cons of changing your surgery charge capture process.

    Take-home tool:
    Strategies for implementing the changes in OR pricing. The specific tools the team used to produce the final results will be available for review and discussion.

    • Jackie Hinderks, FHFMA, Carris Health, Rice Memorial Hospital
    • Kris Lingle, MSN, RN, CNOR, Director of Perioperative Services and Imaging Nursing, Carris Health, Rice Memorial Hospital
  5. 10:00 AM – 11:00 AM
    Leadership

    Phase X: Creating a Nimble Staffing Pattern to Case Volume

    In an active perioperative setting, it’s often hard to ascertain a staffing pattern that moves with the case volume. Phase X (X being the unknown factor, which is case volume) is a process by which the business manager, OR director, and service line managers measure case volume and rooms running. Staffing patterns and shifts are then discussed and put into place. These are measured at 6-month intervals, and staffing is flexed to meet the case volume.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Describe an adaptive electronic tool to provide system viewing for staffing.
    • Discuss creative staffing solutions driven through data metrics.
    • Discuss lessons learned, including future opportunities. Describe financial opportunities for cost reduction in overtime and incentive pay categories

    Take-home tool:
    Staffing tool for assessing the staffing need to case volume.

    • Tracy E. Diffenderfer, MSN, BSN, CNOR, Administrative Director, Perioperative Services, Vanderbilt University Medical Center
    • Cindy L. Kildgore, MSHA, BSN, CNOR, Perioperative Services Director, Vanderbilt University Medical Center
  6. 11:00 AM – 11:30 AM

    Morning Networking Break

  7. 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM
    Performance Improvement/Quality

    Crew Resource Management for Your OR Team

    Crew resource management (CRM) training is not a new concept, but it’s a proven way to improve communication and patient safety. After we identified poor communication as a consistent root cause of adverse events at St. Claire HealthCare, we conducted CRM training via a scenario-based training course that focused on team communication in a variety of practice settings. To measure the outcome, we developed a questionnaire for participants. Results showed that staff perceived improvements in patient safety, team communication, and mutual support after CRM training.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Describe the communication and cultural flaws that can impede patient safety.
    • Discuss how to engage the medical staff in culture change.
    • Identify ways to sustain the culture change in the OR.

    Take-home Tool:
    Quick tip sheet and a sample training agenda will be distributed for attendees to adjust to their own setting.

    • Riki Watts, MSN, RN, NE-BC, CNOR, Director of Surgical Services and Endoscopy, St. Claire Healthcare
  8. 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM
    Finance/Analytics

    Seven Winning Strategies for Equipment Negotiation

    Does your team fully understand best practices for negotiating healthcare equipment purchases? We will share seven best practices based on data gathered from thousands of transactions and hundreds of hospitals, using case studies to illustrate these concepts. You will learn not only how to work better with suppliers but also your own supply chain and finance teams.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Discuss the optimal organizational design for supply chain and OR collaboration.
    • Identify how to set an anchor early in supplier negotiations.
    • Describe how to prepare for equipment negotiations, establish a BATNA, and leverage the benefits of multiparty negotiations.

    Take-home tool:
    Framework for optimal organizational design, best practice outline for the capital equipment responsibilities for both OR and supply chain teams, and a guide to the seven best practices in equipment negotiation, with how-to instructions and a case study for each best practice

    • Tom Derrick, Co-Founder & SVP, OpenMarkets
  9. 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM
    Supply Management

    Look Before You Leap: Assess Current State vs Future Need for Inventory Management System

    The Inova Fairfax Medical Campus has 62 ORs and is looking to expand services and upgrade technology. To improve supply chain operations and reduce overall supply costs, we first conducted a thorough assessment. This allowed us to identify and prioritize improvement opportunities, gain consensus on the value of a well-defined supply chain, and prepare a request for proposal for a new OR inventory management system. The hardest part of doing an assessment is thinking through the details to prioritize the team's time. We will discuss our methods, which we believe can help others in assessing their current state vs future needs.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Identify the framework needed for conducting an OR supply chain assessment.
    • Identify key obstacles and approaches to overcome them.
    • Discuss the lessons learned through the process.

    Take-home tool:
    OR supply chain checklist.

    • Tom Redding, Managing Director, Healthcare, St. Onge Company
    • Kevin Youmans, Vice President, Perioperative Services, Inova Health System, Fairfax Medical Campus
  10. 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
    Keynotes

    Keynote Luncheon/Award Presentation: Perioperative Innovation

    In today’s fast-paced and dynamic healthcare marketplace, it is more important than ever to innovate in order to stay relevant. Nurses and healthcare leaders play a major role in creating a culture of innovation. In this session, we will discuss disruptive innovations and the skill set needed to more effectively create innovative solutions. Knowing how to do this will enable perioperative leaders to optimize their resources, increase efficiency, and deliver better, safer care to their patients.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Describe the new skills healthcare providers need to be effective innovators.
    • Discuss examples of healthcare disruptive technologies.
    • Describe how customers’ beliefs and unmet needs are critical elements of any innovation. Discuss the importance of medical device companies partnering with providers to innovate methods of safer care.
    • Judith Pins, RN, MBA, President, Pfiedler Education
    Sponsored by: Getinge.png
  11. 1:45 PM – 2:45 PM
    Finance/Analytics

    Why and How to Create a Perioperative Surgical Home

    Value-based care requires providers to improve quality of patient care while reducing costs. Coordination of care is the key to success and the foundation of the perioperative surgical home. New technologies, tools, and techniques for driving increased productivity and improved patient care must span the entire surgical encounter, from first appointment to postoperative care. Common problems and potential solutions will be discussed for each aspect of the continuum of care for surgical patients: electronic health record documentation; coordination and efficiency among surgical office staff, anesthesia providers, and the surgical team on the day of surgery; and patient engagement pre and post procedure.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Describe how to justify adoption of a perioperative surgical home model of care.
    • Identify ways to overcome resistance to change.
    • Discuss how to form a high-performance team and provide the tools to get the job done.

    Take-home tool:
    A current state/future state issue and opportunity mapping tool, a project charter and action planning tool, and a financial benefit calculator.

    • Sakinah Abdullah, RN, Patient Services Manager, LifeBridge Health/ Sinai
    • Mark Stega, MD, Chief Operating Officer, Optimium Health, Inc.
  12. 1:45 PM – 2:45 PM
    Leadership

    Three R's of Staff Efficiency: Right Staff, Right Time, Right Place

    Labor costs represent a hospital’s largest expense and account for more than 50% of the total operating revenue. Healthcare executives are holding department directors and managers accountable for managing a worked hours per unit of service (WHPUOS) statistic. To analyze labor productivity, it’s essential to establish a unit of measurement. Central Florida Health implemented WHPUOS to measure and better analyze how labor expenses affect total margins and target goals. We will discuss how we implemented a WHPUOS goal and collaborated with key players and hospital staff to achieve and sustain our WHPUOS targets, which led to significant savings.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Identify a worked hours per unit of service (WHPUOS).
    • Describe how to calculate a daily WHPUOS.
    • Discuss staffing to volume trends. Discuss the actions needed to reduce labor costs. Describe the tools used to achieve and sustain a WHPUOS target.

    Take-home tool:
    A method for what to include in your WHPUOS and how to calculate it. Examples of before and after implementation of the staffing-to-demand tool.

    • Laurie Harsh, MSM, RN, CNOR, Director of Perioperative Services, Leesburg Regional Medical Center
    • Virginia (Ginger) Martin, MSN, BSN, RN, CNOR, Senior Managing Consultant, Berkeley Research Group
  13. 1:45 PM – 2:45 PM
    Supply Management

    Looking Through a Clouded Lens: Consignment Agreements

    Consignment is viewed as the saving grace of inventory management in OR settings. But consignment inventories can become a significant liability to organizations on a financial and operational level if they’re not managed correctly. In this session, we will discuss elements that will make consignment an advantage to your OR, identify what to include in your consignment agreements, and develop strategies to maximize value in your product categories that are managed through consignment arrangements.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Identify which elements of consignment agreements will benefit your organization.
    • Develop processes to control consigned products and create efficiencies for OR and supply chain managers.
    • Describe how to implement consignment agreements in a way that minimizes liability and ensures the accountability of appropriate parties.

    Take-home tool:
    Checklist of terms and conditions to include in consignment agreements.

    • William P. Stitt, CMRP, FAHRMM, Principal and Chief Operating Officer, Credibility Healthcare, LLC
  14. 2:45 PM – 3:15 PM

    Afternoon Networking Break

  15. 3:15 PM – 4:15 PM
    Performance Improvement/Quality

    Create Innovation Ramps, Not Roadblocks, to Speed Review of New Devices and Procedures

    Historically, a Value Analysis Team has assessed the financial benefit of new products, but not their safety. We established an algorithm for all new products or procedures that integrates the Value Analysis Team’s review with an assessment by a Continuous Quality Improvement Team to determine how these can safely be put into practice. Surgeons were concerned about stifling innovation or delaying implementation. However, this new structure decreased the time between a device request to availability from 124 to 51 days, and to date there have been no device-associated safety events of procedures or devices that have gone through this review.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Define the difference between innovation and research.
    • Describe the appropriate implementation plan for new devices and procedures.
    • Discuss the need for integration of financial and safety reviews of innovations.

    Take-home tool:
    Algorithm that helps triage the appropriate implementation plan for new devices or procedures.

    • Tom Aloia, MD, Director, Institute for Cancer Center Innovation, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
    • Abigail Caudle, MD, MS, Executive Medical Director, Perioperative Services, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
  16. 3:15 PM – 4:15 PM
    Finance/Analytics

    Data Can Cure Your Implant Vendor Blues

    Most OR business managers have probably experienced case delays related to vendor implant trays that either weren’t processed or were lost. Where was the ball dropped, and how can you assure surgeons that it won't happen again? In the absence of data, the blame usually falls on the OR or sterile processing department, with interventions that are difficult to track. In 2017, Baylor University Medical Center implemented a specialized system to coordinate vendor case support, collect inventory data, and monitor vendor performance. We will discuss how this system was implemented and how we utilize data to change vendor behavior.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Discuss how to establish a sustainable implant vendor management policy.
    • Identify how to set metrics and leverage data to drive vendor compliance.
    • Describe ways to standardize the vendor case coordination process and how to track, prioritize, and analyze vendor inventory.
    • Shane B. O'Neill, MS, CSBI, LSSYB, Business Director, Perioperative Services, Baylor University Medical Center
  17. 3:15 PM – 4:15 PM
    Leadership

    Building Blocks: How to Calculate Your Optimal Schedule

    As children, when we put building blocks together, we had to estimate and calculate the relative size and number of things we needed. The same principles hold true for perioperative block utilization; we need to know number of rooms, staff, cases per day, type of procedure, individual productivity, and patient logistics. At VA San Diego, we are using real-time perioperative analytics to determine room utilization, surgical specialty use of assigned block time, surgeon-specific operating time by CPT code, add-on caseloads, and staffing and case distribution. Using this information, we can optimize and predict perioperative schedules.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Describe which data provide the most insight for building OR schedules.
    • Discuss how to size blocks to meet clinician, patient, and procedure requirements.
    • Discuss actionable steps VA San Diego took to optimize perioperative efficiency.

    Take-home tool:
    Sample dashboard reports that highlight the data required to develop an optimal perioperative schedule, with examples of schedules optimized for procedures, patients, and individual clinicians.

    • William Ardill, MD, FACS, Associate Chief Surgical Services, Section Chief General Surgery, VA San Diego Medical Center
  18. 4:30 PM – 5:30 PM
    Performance Improvement/Quality

    Mind the Gap: Find the Internal Capacity to Grow and Add New Service Lines

    To plan for growth, healthcare leaders must anticipate the changes in staffing, equipment, instrumentation, and education that will be needed as well as costs. Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) in Boston conducted a retrospective analysis of gaps in the surgery schedule to determine how many cases could be added to its 58 ORs and the increase in net margin. We identified more than 2,000 annual gaps in the MGH surgical schedule of greater than 210 minutes that could be utilized for additional cases, representing more than $2 million in incremental net margin. This generalizable analysis was expanded to other academic medical centers and community hospitals within the Partners Healthcare System.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Identify excess capacity in your ORs.
    • Describe strategies for increasing volume.
    • Discuss operational details for adding service lines and growing volume.

    Take-home tool:
    A list of steps needed to conduct a retrospective analysis of the surgery schedule, tips on how to present data to stakeholders, and a framework for planning additional case volume and service line growth.

    • Meaghan Gray, BS, Director, Sterile Processing, Massachusetts General Hospital
    • Mark Seelen, MBA, MPH, Massachusetts General Hospital
  19. 4:30 PM – 5:30 PM
    Finance/Analytics

    Bridging FTE & Staffing: A Rosetta Stone for Nurses and Budget Offices

    Nursing leaders and budget office staff use different terminology when discussing staffing: full-time equivalents, or FTE (budget) vs unique staff bodies (nursing leaders). Such differences can cause friction in determining proper staffing levels. We will explore the fundamental differences in perspective, review the AORN staffing recommendation model, and then deconstruct that model to show how we built a model to staff for six outpatient ORs. Our insights will help attendees understand the productive and paid FTE as well as unique staffing bodies that are needed to ensure proper staffing levels.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Outline a staffing model of responsibilities and strategy for Perioperative Services
    • Establish synergy of a method for calculating staffing requirements between Perioperative Leadership and Budget Department
    • Build a Perioperative staffing template in a multi-dimensional spreadsheet to assess staffing and cost

    Take-home tools:
    A spreadsheet calculator allowing a user to plug in number of rooms, hours of operation, days a week, and number of breakers, to determine needs for productive FTE, paid FTE, and staff count.
    A spreadsheet calculator allowing a user to plug in a staffing model by hour of day and day of week, which will determine productive hours, paid hours, and staff count.
    A staffing model spreadsheet where RN leadership can enter the number of staff present by hour of day and day of week to determine FTE and staff count.

    • Paul Rhodes, RN, Consultant, AuditMed
    • Blake Stock, MBA, Director of Analytics, OR Hub
  20. 4:30 PM – 5:30 PM
    Leadership

    Relationship Mastery for the Healthcare Professional

    OR business managers are sometimes the only non-clinician in the room, the newest member of the team, or the least experienced person at the table, which puts them at a disadvantage for developing collegial relationships with clinicians. They may compensate by being overly formal or working around people instead of building rapport. According to the Social Style model, there are four basic styles in which people typically act, think, make decisions, and relate to others. Understanding these behavioral styles can help business managers improve working relationships by raising awareness of their own style and those of their colleagues.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Identify the four Social Styles and how to flex behavior to increase interpersonal effectiveness.
    • Discuss how to develop and nurture strong relationships with mentors, healthcare colleagues, and non-healthcare allies, both at work and outside of work.

    Take-home tool:
    A working model of the Social Style, including assessments of team members’ and clinician partners’ social styles.

    • Edwin Ibay, JD, MHA, Assistant Professor, College of Public Health, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
  21. 5:30 PM – 7:30 PM

    San Diego Dine Around

    Called one of "America's best cities for foodies," by Travel & Leisure1 magazine, San Diego’s culinary scene is a burgeoning, vibrant mix of locally inspired flavors, from delightfully simple to sophisticatedly artful. The city's proximity to the ocean and Mexico has greatly influenced both the local cuisine and culture. As a conference attendee, you can receive a discount on your dining bill at participating restaurants!

Wednesday | January 30

  1. 8:30 AM – 9:00 AM

    Networking Breakfast

  2. 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM
    Performance Improvement/Quality

    Navigating the Transition: What It's Like To Be Acquired

    In July 2013, after more than 100 years as an independent facility, UPMC Altoona merged with the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) health system. We had to overcome resistance and gain support to manually recreate more than 1,000 preference cards, implement a new surgical documentation system, change many high-volume consumable products, adopt all new policies, and educate surgeon offices on the new processes that would impact them. You'll gain valuable insight into how to seamlessly manage the transition to a new culture during an acquisition.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Identify the stages in transitioning from a stand-alone hospital to becoming part of a larger network.
    • Describe the actions needed to shift your perioperative suite from worst to first.
    • Discuss how to prepare for the inherent challenges of an acquisition.

    Take-home tool:
    A preference card tracking sheet, on-time start metrics, and noncompliance letters for physician tardiness.

    • Dana M. Kopera, MBA, BSN, RN, CNOR, Clinical Director, Surgical Services, UPMC Altoona
    • Barbara E. Nosek, MHA, Process Consultant, Client Services & PMO, UPMC Supply Chain Management
  3. 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM
    Finance/Analytics

    A Look in the Rearview Mirror: Paving the Way for Future Cost Avoidance

    A look into the past can often predict our future. It can also assist in changing our future by analyzing what the data are telling us. This presentation will look at perioperative issues that have been persistently repeated in the top 10 patient safety concerns and top 10 technology hazards for healthcare organizations since 2010. By correlating your own data to the identified issues, you can develop strategies to drive your quality and safety initiatives. Eliminating or mitigating risks can result in improved reimbursement and significantly lower costs associated with adverse events.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Describe persistent challenges to patient safety and quality and the hazards inherent in the increasing adoption of technologies in the perioperative area.
    • Describe strategies for implementing evidence-based practices to mitigate or eliminate the risks of patient harm.
    • Identify effective tools to drive quality and patient safety initiatives.

    Take-home tool:
    Examples of which data elements to analyze and how to identify quality and safety initiatives most likely to lower costs and improve delivery of care.

    • Gail M. Horvath, MSN, RN, CNOR, CRCST, Senior Patient Safety Analyst and Consultant, ECRI Institute
    • Catherine Pusey, MBA, BSN, RN, Manager, Safety and Quality Consulting, ECRI Institute
  4. 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM
    Leadership

    Busy vs Productive: How to Meet OR Labor Benchmark Goals

    Have you been told to make staffing changes in order to meet a benchmark percentile goal? Are you struggling to understand and believe the benchmark data you were provided? Gain an understanding of the variables used in creating labor benchmarks; how you can address the data, statistics, and definitions of OR-specific benchmark data; and how to meet or even exceed benchmark goals. Labor represents approximately 55% expenses in the acute care environment. Learn how proper financial management and strategies to maximize productivity can help right-size staffing for your OR case load.

    Take-home tool:
    An OR Benchmark Variable Worksheet that defines OR-specific labor benchmark variables explains how to map departments and compare groups and statistics.

    • Sharon K. Ulep, MBB, CMCA, CPHQ, Master Black Belt/Principal, Plante Moran
  5. 10:15 AM – 11:15 AM
    Finance/Analytics

    Hard-Wiring Cost Savings into Your Culture

    Cost savings begins with developing a culture focused on innovation, safety, and patient experience. At Marshall Surgery, we transformed our culture to one in which cost savings is an everyday activity. We created service line teams consisting of staff from sterile processing, the OR nurse, OR surgical technologist, and OR coordinator to identify waste, implement Lean practices, and collaborate with surgeons. We also developed a surgeon coalition. Through this infrastructure, we promoted the value of group problem solving. We saved more than $200,000 in 2017, and we set a goal to save more than $300,000 in 2018.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Identify three key components of a culture that promotes cost savings.
    • Describe the tools to create a cost savings culture.
    • Discuss the positive impact of service line teams and surgeon collaboration on cost savings.

    Take-home tool:
    Steps for transforming culture and structure for service line leads.

    • Megan Nebozuk, BSN, RN, Director of Surgical Services, Marshall Medical Centers
  6. 10:15 AM – 11:15 AM
    Leadership

    Decreasing OR Turnover Time: A Resource-Neutral Initiative

    Can room turnover time be reduced without using additional resources? A process improvement initiative at our facility involving data collection and workflow analysis showed that it can. The initiative included one surgeon’s patients who had total joint replacement with spinal anesthesia. We saw opportunities to improve workflow for the anesthesiologist, circulating, and postanesthesia care nurses. From a baseline turnover time of 37 minutes, we achieved a 10% reduction to 33 minutes by changing patient flow with no additional human or capital resources. The time saved allowed us to add one case per day, Monday through Friday, potentially increasing revenue.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Define operative and non-operative time, and turnover time as a component of non-operative time.
    • Describe the change in staff workflow and tasks that reduced turnover time.
    • Identify needs related to managing change in an interdisciplinary group.
    • Carolyn Millen, DHA, MSN, RN, NE-BC, Northwest Hospital and Medical Center, UW Medicine
  7. 10:15 AM – 11:15 AM
    Supply Management

    What Is That Central Sterile Department Doing?

    A 3-year journey (2015 to 2018) turned a failing central sterile department (CSD) into a highly reliable, quality focused department in the Altru Health System. Through a calculated investment in the CSD infrastructure, education, and quality testing products, we achieved a reduction in immediate use steam sterilization rates from 15% to 4%, and an increase in complete assemblies of instrument sets from 88.8% to 95.4%. In addition, the CSD has centralized all high-level disinfection and endoscope reprocessing, and relationships between CSD and OR staff have improved.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Describe how CSD analytics drive changes in patient safety initiatives and quality metrics.
    • Identify specific CSD analytics data points that affect cost savings in the OR setting.
    • Discuss an interdisciplinary team and analytics approach to the relationship between the CSD and OR.

    Take-home tool:
    List of analytic points to consider in optimizing the relationship of the CSD and OR, including CSD-specific analytics and a case for developing analytic positions for surgical service lines.

    • Jenni Gibbs, BS, Manager, Altru Health System
  8. 11:15 AM – 11:15 AM

    Adjourn


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